Monthly Archives: October 2011

Nanowrimo…It’s on! (soon)

Well we are mere days away from the annual writing excercise the a lot of writers both wait for with eager anticipation and dread of agonizing writing sessions where the words fight you every step of the way.

National Novel Writing Month – NaNoWriMo.

30 days. 50,000 words. It’s a thrill and a half for writers everywhere…and I’m going to take a crack at it again this year.

If you’ve followed my recent posts, you know I’ve been struggling available time to write. Period. It would seem like I would be adding insult to injury by forcing myself to come with at least 1667 words a day when I haven’t been able muster a couple of hundred. The point of the exercise is to get the writer to write – which is what I need to be doing.

The winning NaNo is one of the biggest thrills I’ve had since I started writing seriously. It was hard. It was frustrating. But having that hard deadline that means something helps tremendously. After I won in ’08, I went on a writing tear for a few months. I was at the keyboard, routinely hitting my 1500 words per session.

So with time being such a problem, how can I possibly hope to meet this goal this year? Well, this very post indicates one way. I’m writing this on wordpress 1.5 on my phone. I’m at the fair, watching my daughter and her friend ride the rides and during that time I’ve composed nearly 250 words. The way to accomplish this is to write something during any scrap of free time that comes available.

I don’t think I have a story idea that could generate 50K words on its own, but if I crank out a couple of novellas: mission accomplished.

So stay tuned for updates and check out http://www.nanowrimo.org

Posted with WordPress for BlackBerry.

Don’t lose focus

I started this blog with the intention of sharing my experience with the trials and tribulations of writing and self-publishing.  As evident in the date of my last post, I haven’t shared anything in quite a while.  There hasn’t been much to share.  In part…its my fault.

I have posted, at great length, about the importance of writing constantly;  not only to help drive your sales with a steady flow of new material for your readers, but also to foster good, lasting writing habits for the new writer (namely me).

The last couple of months have been a series of those “life rolls” that Dean Wesley Smith talks about.  The work environment has been in a state of flux for weeks.  Lots and lots of changes with positions and personnel in the company that pile on the workload for us in addition to the normal day-to-day tasks.  Then there’s my family that pretty much takes up the remaining time of the day.

On the rare occasion that I can sit down to write, I pretty much get no where.  It’s been several weeks since I’ve been able to commit anything to paper (or word doc) that’s been worth saving and building on.  Because I did not commit to writing to something everyday, and work through being tired and frustrated, I’ve put myself into that position that we, as writers, do everything we can to avoid.

Writing has become hard.

The only way out of this rut is to write.  Not that sounds like a deadend answer, doesn’t it?  How do I get back into the swing of things when I haven’t been able to make myself do so, otherwise?  For me, it means I have to carve out time outside of the norm.  If I can do that, I can complete the few stories I have that are not quite ready for primetime, bringing them to the Kindle and Nook for your enjoyment, and start digging into those ideas that have been begging me to write them for months.

So it looks like I’ll be setting my alarm for 4:00am.  That’ll allow for an hour and a half before i have to get the kids up for school – potentially 1,000 words.  I’ll be happy with that…for a while.

So the lesson to be learned here is:  Don’t let this happen to you.  Writing should be an escape from the stress of that which is keeping you from writing.  If you put off writing because you’re tired or stressed, when there really is time that you can carve out of the day, it will make it difficult to get things going again when your life stabilizes back into some sort of normalcy.

Stay tuned.

Stay tuned.