Malcolm Gladwell’s “10,000 Hour Rule” Doesn’t Add Up

Read and you make the call. To become exceptional at anything surely takes a ton of sustained effort, but to say you put the average at 10,000 for anything doesn’t seem logical. If that were the case, people would start tracking their hours on a spreadsheet and actually count on being great

All About Work

As regular readers of this blog know, it bugs me when writers get things wrong or can’t be bothered to justify their facts. Recently I’ve been seeing a lot of references to the “10,000 hour rule” – the idea that you need to spend 10,000 hours on an activity to be successful at it.  I knew that this idea was popularized by writer Malcolm Gladwell in his book Outliers, but I didn’t know where he got the idea from or what it was based on.

So imagine my surprise when I Googled “10,000 hour rule” and found this very recent letter by K. Anders Ericsson, the lead author of the study that Gladwell cites as “Exhibit A”  in support of the “rule”. Not only does Ericsson say that Gladwell “invented” the 10,000 hour rule, but he also describes Gladwell  as making a “provocative generalization to a magical number”.

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About Thomas J. rock

Writer of Science Fiction

Posted on January 24, 2014, in The Daily Grind. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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